Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Finally a good night

It was a Tuesday night and the sky was clear. I decided to go for it even though I had work in the morning. I was eager to try out my coma corrector lens. Everyone on the forum told me that my 8 in astrograph reflector was my better telescope, I have been using my smaller 80mm (3in) refractor. I like my refactor but was having trouble with the very dim galaxies and on paper the 8in should do much better. However I was not having much luck with it. Well after asking around I figured out that I needed to buy a coma corrector lens. This is because the astrograph is very fast f/3.9 and the curved image on the flat DSLR sensor created stars that looked like little comets. The coma corrector fixed that as you can see in the pics for this post.

I did not have a target already selected because this was an unplanned night. I scanned down the list of targets and I had to decide. One targets with many subs, or several targets with much fewer subs? I decided I did not want to put all my eggs in one basket and went for several targets that night with the idea that I will select the best and delicate an entire night to re-image it later.


Well I am very happy with the results and I think I can still do better with the equipment I have. It is nice to see some progress finally!

M1 Crab-Nebula

M1 Crab Nebula
8in Astrograph reflector, guided
14 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 28 mn 0 s
Dark: 10 frames (ISO: 400) exposure: 2 mn 0 s
4/2/2013

M106

M106
8in Astrograph reflector, guided
22 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 58 mn 40 s
Dark: 5 frames (ISO : 400) exposure: 2 mn 40 s
4/2/2013

NGC3359

NGC3359
8in Astrograph reflector, guided
13 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 34 mn 40 s
Dark: 5 frames (ISO : 400) exposure: 2 mn 40 s
4/2/2013















Sunday, March 24, 2013

Travel rig for upcoming trip

This rig weighs in at about 30lbs, with a non-computerized astronomy mount fixed on top a traditional camera tripod. 
Travel rig with camera only.  This might be a more realistic setup for a trip to CA.


I am going to Las Vegas for a work conference and hope to stay a few extra days to do some star gazing. I went through my stuff and tried to come up with a rig small enough to pack in my carry-on luggage. The pictures above is what I came up with. I got lucky and was able to easly pop the head off of my camera tripod and attach the head from my pier extension. The skyview pro is perfect; it is light and only takes four D batteries to drive the RA. It is not computerized but I plan to do wide field stuff. I am hoping to go someplace dark enough to get a nice Milky Way picture with my camera’s telephoto lenses. At that wide of a view and with the skyview mount I should be able to expose for a min or so (not sure). This guess is based on the fact that I was able to take a good 30 second exposure with my Orion ED80 refactor telescope. If I can, with the help of my skyview mount, expose for 30 second with a telescope I assume I could get close to 60 seconds without. In the end, I may not need to expose that long anyway but I would like to know what to expect my maximum to be. I will try taking just a pic with my camera before I go and update this post but for now the Moon is bright in the night sky and I don’t feel like trying my telephoto lenses. I did however take a practice 30 exposure with my ED80 just to see if I would get star trails and the results were pretty good.

Test shot of random section of Orion. This is a 3X30sec subs taken to test tracking of my travel rig.  Not bad, no star trails!


Friday, March 8, 2013

Making the best of a bad night

The weather has been so bad for so long that I went ahead and did some imaging tonight even though conditions were not that great.  I started with M81 which is small and dim.  That was not going that well so I switch to M45 which is much brighter, but by that time that a thin fog like layer rolled in.  If you google images of M45 you will see just how poor my image is.  On the up side, I got a new guide scope and used the night to learn a little more about my tracking.  I just found that PHD has graphs that are better than the EQMOD guiding graph.  More on that later…


M81 and M82 - Mode's nebulae (Galaxy)
M81 is near the center towards the top (galaxy face on like a pancake)
M82 is in the upper left (galaxy edge on like a cigar)




M45 Pleiades
There are supposed to 7 bright stars with a lot of nebulosity but this just looks like a small "big dipper" :-)



Overall Summary

Target: M81
Type: Galaxy
Magnitude: 6.90
Size: 0 deg 25 min 42 sec

Target: M45
Type: Nebula
03/08/2013


Caption

M81 and M82 - Mode's nebulae (Galaxy)
M45 Pleiades

Taken on my back patio in Powell Ohio.
Archive:
C:\aegstuff\astro\journal_media\2013\03\08

Monday, February 18, 2013

Learning remote control because it is cold

Two things happened in February 1) I finally got EQMod working and 2) It got real cold! These two things may not seem related but stick with me… Several months ago I came across EQMod [software for controlling your telescope] and put it aside at the first issue. In hindsight it was easy to overcome the problem but at the time it was just information overload. I was still learning how to use my synscan hand controller and PC control was just over the top. Also integrating everything (planetarium software, imaging software, auto-guiding software) with EQMod is very cool but not very portable. I would still like to hold open the ideal of having a grab-n-go setup. However, I eventually figured out 1) it is just to cool and to fun not to take advantage of all the goodies on your PC that can be used for astrophotography and 2) you can always buy as secondary telescope :-) And this is what I have done. I have a secondary telescope that I plan to use for visual observing while my camera is exposing for hours. But currently it is so cold that my secondary telescope has not seen much use, wait until spring!

Back to my main point, once I got EQMod working it was possible to control everything from my PC and using one PC to remote into as second PC is something I do every day at work so that was no problem. I am now able to setup my telescope on the back patio, do an initial polar alignment then do everything else form in the house. Below shows my first failed attempts while controlling my setup from inside. When you are not there to watch things stuff happens. The wires get caught on things, the telescope hits the pier… stuff like that.

This is supposed to be M81/M82 galaxies but I had so much trouble with my large 8” telescope (Clay and I call it the cannon because that is what it looks like). I really think that with all the photo equipment I am over my weight capacity with this thing. I just can’t get consistent results from the cannon and here is an example. I am probably only a few degrees off but I have no idea where this is pointing. I tried to match the star field with the images in my planetarium software but I am bad at that and gave up soon enough. As far as I know M81 is in the FOV but just not visible. The seeing that night was not good and I started to accumulate frost on my lenses so who knows. 

M81/M82 Failed attempt

This is supposed to be the Rosette nebula (NGC 2237) which is huge so I have trouble thinking I was just a few degrees off. Even if I was not spot on I should get some red nebula affect. You can see what looks something like red nebula but again it could just be frost/fog and noise. Like I said it was just a bad night. 

Rosette nebula (NGC 2237) Failed attempt

Let’s look at the good side. I can finally remote control my telescope and that means I don’t need to freeze to death just to adjust the alignment or auto-guiding! Also EQMod has many advanced features that I can start to take advantage of. For example, I can now see a “real time” graph of the auto-guiding pulses [the adjustments sent to the mount]. In this way I can see how well the tracking is doing and if the telescope is drifting I can make adjustments. This is way better than taking hours of images only to discard them because of star trails. However, you have too make numerous small adjustments over a long time [like steering a large boat] and if I had to be outside for that I would just freeze. Maybe that will be the focus of my next post because as I type this I realize the activity of “auto-guiding real time pulse graphs” may not be that accessible :-)

Saturday, February 9, 2013

First attempt to image at Kelsey’s Observatory

It has been over a year and I am just now getting Kelsey’s Observatory to the point that I can use it. Hey what can I say the to-do list out here at the barn is large. My neighbor Al, fixed the slit cover so now it is possible to just close the hatch when I am done and deal with break-down in the morning. For me packing up when I am cold and tired is the worst part and if I can do it the next day in the light it is a big advantage. If this sounds petty just look at the picture of the full PC controlled setup below and consider just how large the task of disassembly is. All the little tasks of rolling up the cords and replacing the lenses covers and stuff like that that really adds up.



The slit cover is on! There is still some work to latch it at the bottom, but it swivels around for viewing just fine.

Shows the software and connections needed to automate the control of my go-to mount as well as the guiding and main camera. See the real stuff below.

I took my Canon off for safe keeping but other than that here is the entire setup. The iPad in the background is a nice touch.  

From a different angle


My first imaging sessions in the observatory was mostly a failure in that I was not able to execute my plan for the evening. In the end I gave up and took another picture of M42 because it is an easy target but even that was a botched job. The camera was accidently set to a lower image quality and the clouds rolled in half way through the session. You can see M42 below, all in all a very good picture considering all the mistakes.

At the start of the night I had the M81 galaxy and a set of guide stars queued up in AstroPlanner. This is the first time I used AstroPlanner in the field and I realized real quick that all the guide stars were too low on the horizon. I built my plan using Stellarium (planetarium software) which could not tell me where the building and trees are at the barn and so I could not align my mount with the guide stars selected. I had to select a few new stars and as easy as that might sound it is hard to view the constellations from the little opening in the observatory. I don’t know my constellations that well and this just made it worse.

I eventually got things worked out but not before getting chilled to the bone! It is frustrating knowing I could get quicker results without the PC controlled setup but it has more options for automation and planning. The fact that I can program my camera to take pictures for hours at a time unattended is just awesome. Also the auto-guiding is a big plus. Eventually you start to get “second degree” automation. For example, BackyardEOS which controls my main camera can tell PHD (used for auto-guiding) to move the mount between pictures (this is called dithering) which is only possible once you have everything automated. Eventually I hope to turn the power of AstroPlanner to my advantage but for now I am just cold and frustrated.


M42 - The Great Nebula in Orion
8 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 8 mn 0 s
Taken with my 8in Astrograph reflector, guided
Note: Originals taken in jpg format by mistake


Overall Summary

Target: M42 - The Great Nebula in Orion
Type: Nebula
Magnitude: 4.00
Size: 1 deg 6 min 00 sec
02/09/2013

Caption

M42 - The Great Nebula in Orion, 8 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 8 mn 0 s, taken on 8in Astrograph reflector, guided, Note: Originals taken in jpg format by mistake

DSS Summary 

Stacking mode: Standard
Alignment method: Automatic
Drizzle x3 enabled
Cosmetic applied to hot pixels (Filter = 1 px, Detection Threshold = 70.2%)
Cosmetic applied to cold pixels (Filter = 1 px, Detection Threshold = 90.1%)
Stacking step 1 ->8 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 8 mn 0 s
RGB Channels Background Calibration: Yes
Per Channel Background Calibration: No
Method: Kappa-Sigma (Kappa = 2.00, Iterations = 5)
-> No Offset
-> No Dark
-> No Flat


Location and Weather

Taken in the Kelsey Observatory out at the Ohio Barn Bed and Breakfast in Fairborn, OH
Taken on my back patio in Powell Ohio.
Climatological Report (http://www.nws.noaa.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=iln)
Temperature (F) Max:38 Min:19 Ave: 29
Precipitation (IN) 0.00
Average wind speed 10mph
Humidity (%) HI: 91 Low: 44 Ave: 68

Individual Exposure Detail

File Name M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+50f_1431stdev_20130209-22h00m28s594ms.JPG
Camera Model Canon EOS REBEL T2i
Firmware Firmware Version 1.0.9
Shooting Date/Time 2/9/2013 11:04:14 PM
Author Tony Gilkerson
Owner's Name Tony Gilkerson
Shooting Mode Manual Exposure
Tv( Shutter Speed ) 60
Av( Aperture Value ) 0.0
Metering Mode Evaluative Metering
ISO Speed 400
Auto ISO Speed OFF
Image Size 2592x1728
Image Quality Fine
Flash Off
FE lock OFF
White Balance Mode Auto
AF Mode Manual focusing
Picture Style Standard
Sharpness 3
Contrast 0
Saturation 0
Color tone 0
Color Space sRGB
Long exposure noise reduction 2:On
High ISO speed noise reduction 2:Strong
Highlight tone priority 0:Disable
Auto Lighting Optimizer Disable
Peripheral illumination correction Enable
Dust Delete Data No
File Size 1120KB
Drive Mode Single shooting
Live View Shooting OFF
Camera Body No. 2923404023
Comment

Archive:

C:\aegstuff\astro\journal_media\2013\02\09\M42_60s_400iso_BULB\orig\BYE\

Light

M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1403stdev_20130209-22h22m45s766ms.JPG
M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1438stdev_20130209-22h20m31s500ms.JPG
M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1445stdev_20130209-22h18m18s344ms.JPG
M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1454stdev_20130209-22h02m41s485ms.JPG
M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1462stdev_20130209-22h16m05s766ms.JPG
M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1468stdev_20130209-22h04m54s672ms.JPG
M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1471stdev_20130209-22h07m08s469ms.JPG
M42-TEST_LIGHT_60s_400iso_+52f_1475stdev_20130209-22h11m35s328ms.JPG

Dark

None – I had the noise reduction feature turn on so the darks were taken and subtracted by my DSLR as during the imaging session.

DeepSkyStacker 3.3.3 beta 47



Friday, January 18, 2013

My first star-hop

Star-hopping in Orion might look something like this

Star-hopping is a way to use “printed” star charts to find hard-to-find deep sky objects with a manual telescope. I have a computerized telescope with go-to capabilities so you might think I don’t need to star-hop, but I have thought of a few good reasons to do it:

  1. The ability to function with a minimal foot-print will make me more portable (less equipment, easier setup, no need for AC power) and therefore open to more observing events. I can more realistically plan a star gazing trip if all I need is a small mount and telescope and an iPad. 
  2. Gives me something to do now that I have my astro-imaging sessions automated. It can take many hours to take all the needed exposures and star-hopping is a great way to see the stars while my main telescope/mount are in use. Remember I can’t use my main setup for observing when I have my camera mounted. 
  3. Just for fun. I was not sure if I would like it but I was amazed at how fun it was. I am not going to try and describe it, just trust me it was fun. 

I tried to read up on how to star-hop before I began but I don’t think I ever finished any of the articles. They were not fun to read, it is always hard to describe how to do some physical activity. It is like the instructions for putting together a piece of furniture. I don’t know about you but I usually jump straight into the activity and only grab the instructions when I get into trouble. Well in this case I was able to do it without going to the text. I did pick easy targets to start with but the basic star-hopping techniques were used. Here is what I did in general:

  1. Pick a target like M42, the Great Nebula in Orion 
  2. Locate a nearby bright star, in this case Alnitak or Rigel 
  3. Center the star in the finder scope; this must be done by directly pointing the telescope at the star. If you can’t do this then you are out of luck but with my new red-dot finder this was easy. 
  4. Determine the cardinal points on the crosshairs in my eyepiece 
  5. Use SkySafari on the iPad to zoom in on the star. Display a 2 degree circle, which is approximately my field of view (FOV) with the crosshairs. 
  6. Find a star pattern like a triangle that is at the edge of my FOV in the direction of my target. 
  7. Center the triangle on the crosshairs (do the same for crosshairs on the iPad) 
  8. Repeat steps 6 and 7 until you make it to your target. 

The hardest part was step #4 but over time I think this will be easy. The experience was fun it feels like you are accomplishing a lot with a very low tech setup. Of course you have to ignore the fact that a star chart is an awesome piece of technology, but lets ignore that :-)

Sunday, December 23, 2012

M1 - Crab nebula

I was initially disappointed when I developed the image for M1. After imaging M31 “The Great nebula in Andromeda” I was use to more detail. However, I started to look at the specs and I realized that M1 is small and dim compared to M31, so I reset my expectations. With an 80mm telescope I probable can’t expect much on such a small object. Also, the seeing was bad and I could only expose for 80 seconds. I should be able to expose for 3 to 5 minutes at least (I think). Strange because the sky looked dark but my exposures test were bad at the longer exposures, I think maybe it is all the Christmas lights around the pond :-) Actually I got specs of frost on the aperture that might have affected things. 

Don’t you think M1 is appropriate for the season? Some think the Christmas Star that revealed the birth of Jesus was actually an exploding supernova. M1 is an expanding cloud of gas from the explosion of a brilliant supernova observed in A.D. 1054 by Oriental astronomers. Near the center of the nebula is a 16th-magnitude star that is the collapsed core of the supernova. This object is the pulsar NP 0532. I know the timing is all wrong but work with me. I was going to image NGC 2264, sometimes called “Christmas Tree Cluster” but I am trying to image all the Messier objects first.

I am loving the BackyardEOS software, the ability to program the imaging session and walk away or do some observing is awesome. On this night I just ran back into the house to warm up. It was not super cold but I am not use to it yet. This was my first attempt to use flats. I think I did something wrong because in the end I removed the flats from the post processing. I will need to read up on how to take flats. I put a white T-shirt over the aperture and put the camera on the AV setting but I think my mistake was my flashlight; it was like a spot light. I believe I need something like a florescent light with even light distribution.

Lastly, this is the first time I started using GIMP for post processing. Up until now I used DSS to adjust the color curves but this task is better suited for photo shop or GIMP. I use GIMP because it is very powerful and free.


M1 - Crab nebula
32 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 42 mn 40 s
taken on ED80 32, Guided


M1 - Crab nebula
32 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 42 mn 40 s
taken on ED80 32, Guided



Overall Summary

Target: M1 - Crab nebula
Type: Nebula
Magnitude: 8.40
Size: 0 deg 6 min 00 sec
12/23/2012

Caption

M1 - Crab nebula, 32 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 42 mn 40 s, taken on ED80 32 – Guided


DSS Summary

Stacking mode: Standard
Alignment method: Automatic
Stacking step 1 ->32 frames (ISO: 400) - total exposure: 42 mn 40 s
RGB Channels Background Calibration: No
Per Channel Background Calibration: Yes
Method:
-> No Offset
-> Dark: 20 frames (ISO : 400) exposure: 1 mn 20 s, Method: Median
-> No Flat

Location and Weather

Taken on my back patio in Powell Ohio.
Climatological Report (http://www.nws.noaa.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=iln)
Temperature (F) Max:41 Min:21 Ave: 32
Precipitation (IN) 0.00
Average wind speed 1
Humidity (%) HI: 96 Low: 54 Ave: 75

Individual Exposure Detail

File Name M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+34f_307stdev_20121223-05h45m51s984ms.CR2
Camera Model Canon EOS REBEL T2i
Firmware Firmware Version 1.0.9
Shooting Date/Time 12/23/2012 6:48:52 AM
Author Tony Gilkerson
Owner's Name Tony Gilkerson
Shooting Mode Manual Exposure
Tv( Shutter Speed ) 80
Av( Aperture Value ) 0.0
Metering Mode Evaluative Metering
ISO Speed 400
Auto ISO Speed OFF
Image Size 5184x3456
Image Quality RAW
Flash Off
FE lock OFF
White Balance Mode Auto
AF Mode Manual focusing
Picture Style Standard
Sharpness 3
Contrast 0
Saturation 0
Color tone 0
Color Space sRGB
Long exposure noise reduction 0:Off
High ISO speed noise reduction 2:Strong
Highlight tone priority 0:Disable
Auto Lighting Optimizer Disable
Peripheral illumination correction Enable
Dust Delete Data No
File Size 20288KB
Drive Mode Single shooting
Live View Shooting OFF
Camera Body No. 2923404023
Comment

Archive:

C:\aegstuff\astro\journal_media\2012\12\23\M1_ED80_80s_400iso_Guided\

Light

M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+34f_319stdev_20121223-05h38m37s953ms.CR2
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M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+34f_336stdev_20121223-05h22m26s171ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+34f_340stdev_20121223-05h20m03s125ms.CR2
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M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+34f_343stdev_20121223-05h15m24s921ms.CR2
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M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_363stdev_20121223-04h55m24s828ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_365stdev_20121223-04h50m42s046ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_370stdev_20121223-04h48m36s843ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_373stdev_20121223-04h43m21s468ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_374stdev_20121223-04h41m13s187ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_375stdev_20121223-04h39m00s625ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_377stdev_20121223-04h36m36s906ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_382stdev_20121223-04h31m32s843ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+36f_382stdev_20121223-04h34m05s171ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+37f_382stdev_20121223-04h29m02s703ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+37f_384stdev_20121223-04h24m29s093ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+37f_386stdev_20121223-04h26m35s609ms.CR2
M1_LIGHT_80s_400iso_+37f_390stdev_20121223-04h22m05s718ms.CR2

Dark

Master Dark -> MasterDark_ISO400_80s.tif
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+32f_040stdev_20121223-06h49m23s046ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+34f_040stdev_20121223-06h52m59s578ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+34f_042stdev_20121223-06h51m11s140ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+36f_041stdev_20121223-06h54m47s203ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+36f_041stdev_20121223-06h56m35s015ms.CR2
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M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+37f_041stdev_20121223-07h00m10s968ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+37f_041stdev_20121223-07h01m58s703ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+37f_041stdev_20121223-07h03m47s046ms.CR2
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M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+39f_041stdev_20121223-07h16m27s203ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+39f_041stdev_20121223-07h18m15s015ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+39f_041stdev_20121223-07h21m51s875ms.CR2
M1_DARK_80s_400iso_+39f_041stdev_20121223-07h23m40s921ms.CR2

DeepSkyStacker 3.3.3 beta 47